Skip to content
Mike Evans-Larah By Mike Evans-Larah Software Engineer III
Using the endjin composition framework in an MVC application

As I was setting up the framework for my apprenticeship portal MVC 4 web application, I used part of endjin's core composition framework for the dependency injection, which utilises Castle Windsor.

(Here is a link to some useful videos on dependency injection and Castle Windsor that helped me to understand why they are used).

The best hour you can spend to refine your own data strategy and leverage the latest capabilities on Azure to accelerate your road map.

Part of the framework uses a class called WindsorContainerBootstrapper which calls a GetInstallers method which looks through all referenced assemblies and finds and returns a list of the Windsor Installers that are contained within them.

public class WindsorContainerBootstrapper : IContainerBootstrapper
  {
    public IWindsorInstaller[] GetInstallers()
    {
      return new IWindsorInstaller[1]
      {
        FromAssembly.InDirectory(new AssemblyFilter("./", (string) null))
      };
    }
  }

This was designed for console applications though. To make this work, I made a change so that it uses the HttpRuntime.BinDirectory method to correctly locate the bin folder where the assemblies are stored in a web application.

public class WindsorContainerWebBootstrapper : IContainerBootstrapper
{
    public IWindsorInstaller[] GetInstallers()
    {
        return new[] { FromAssembly.InDirectory(new AssemblyFilter(HttpRuntime.BinDirectory, "*.dll")) };
    }
}
The Introduction to Rx.NET 2nd Edition (2024) Book, by Ian Griffiths & Lee Campbell, is now available to download for FREE.

This extra class could not be added to Endjin.Core.Composition though as HttpRuntime is dependent on System.Web, and Endjin.Core.Composition uses the .NET 4 Client Profile which does not support this.

So I added a new WindsorContainerWebBootstrapper class to the project and called it in the dependency injection configuration to initialise a new Windsor Container.

public class ContainerConfig
{
    public static void InitialiseContainer()
    {
        ApplicationServiceLocator.Initialize(new WindsorContainer(), new WindsorContainerWebBootstrapper());
        var container = ApplicationServiceLocator.Container;
        
        // MVC
        DependencyResolver.SetResolver(
            x => container.Kernel.HasComponent(x) ? container.Resolve(x) : null,
            x => container.Kernel.HasComponent(x) ? container.ResolveAll(x).Cast<object>() : new object[0]);
    }
}

This means I can now resolve my types dynamically.

(As a side note, we now have a GitHub Gist plugin installed for the blog so all the pasted code looks pretty)

@MikeLarah

Mike Evans-Larah

Software Engineer III

Mike Evans-Larah

Mike is a Software Engineer at endjin with over a decade of experience in solving business problems with technology. He has worked on a wide range of projects for clients across industries such as financial services, recruitment, and retail, with a strong focus on Azure technologies.